Revisiting Greenham Church…..

In my recent research, I stumbled upon something of interest. I found a man named Green Hill who was a Methodist Minister. Green Hill hosted Methodist preachers at his home in Louisburg, NC from 1785- 1794. He moved to Tennessee in 1796. Maybe instead of “Greenham Church”, it was “Green Hill Church” that Cornelius came from before going to Turkey Creek Baptist Church in 1801.

Also, Cornelius Cook purchased the books “Westley Sermons” and “Simpson’s Plea”  from Reverend Zechariah Arnold’s estate in 1827 in Laurens, SC. Both books were affiliated with the Methodist Church and Methodist teachings. I am still researching this in hopes it will help me the birth location of Cornelius Cook and Mary Cook Donaldson, and also help me to find their parents.

I always welcome comments and questions, so please speak up.

Have a great week!

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Author: samanthanifong

I have been a avid history buff since age 10. I graduated from the College of Charleston with a B.A. in US History. I have been researching my family for 12 years. I specialize in South Carolina history and research. I do freelance genealogy work centered around South Carolina between 1750- 1880. If you have ancestors in South Carolina between 1750-1880 that you would like me to locate, please contact me. Disclaimer.....My research is based on actual evidence which I may or may not post. Any photographs or documentation that I use is my intellectual property unless otherwise noted and may not be used or borrowed without my expressed written consent.

One thought on “Revisiting Greenham Church…..”

  1. Mystery solved! That’s very neat!!!!!! Always love your updates!

    Hugs

    Debbie Donaldson

    On Mon, Oct 14, 2019, 9:03 PM Home | Samantha Nifong Genealogy Consulting wrote:

    > samanthanifong posted: “In my recent research, I stumbled upon something > of interest. I found a man named Green Hill who was a Methodist Minister. > Green Hill hosted Methodist preachers at his home in Louisburg, NC from > 1785- 1794. He moved to Tennessee in 1796. Maybe instead of ” >

    Like

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